The Unheard Story of David and Goliath

Recently, I have been loving the talks being made in TED and one that caught my attention (even before the book was published) is the one described by Malcolm Gladwell. He has an unusual insight in the fight surrounding the fight between David and Goliath.

It’s a classic underdog tale: David, a young shepherd armed only with a sling, beats Goliath, the mighty warrior. The story has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks Malcolm Gladwell, is that really what the David and Goliath story is about? Watch and learn the fascinating story that has lessons which can let us see the wisdom behind David’s strength.

During his time, David’s three older brothers have been part of King Saul’s army and he was a shepherd. Since he was small and a shepherd, I believe he learned how to use a sling shot to protect his sheep. Remember that the Benjamites of Israel were the only recorded tribe who can use a sling shot and not miss a hair. But they were almost annihilated because of their wickedness.

After David killed Goliath, the whole Israel announced that David has killed his thousand while King Saul has slain his hundreds but the only person killed by David at that time was Goliath. So here are my lessons:

  • Don’t be afraid to be different.
  • Use your mind more to overcome competition.
  • What is common (and underused) can be used for your advantage.
  • The technology in today’s world is much more powerful and effective in accumulating wealth. So, learn and use them properly and effectively.
  • In creating wealth today, the old way of doing things will take you a lot of years (perhaps never) to get the wealth that would sustain you and your descendants up to fourth generation.
  • Don’t be afraid to learn new things so you can have new experiences.

Kindly share this or re-blog or re-tweet if you appreciate it and spread the idea!

To your success,

Jake De La Cruz

©2014 All rights reserved.

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