Category Archives: Book Review

Similar Event. Different Reactions.

I just finished reading the book, David and Goliath. Malcolm Gladwell shared an idea that the same or similar event can be profoundly damaging to one group of people while leaving another group extremely inspired.

Continue reading Similar Event. Different Reactions.

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The two types of Learning

I have been reading this book and I’m learning some stuffs I’d like to share. In his book David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell makes the distinction between what he calls capitalization learning and compensation learning.

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“Would you choose to be a Big Fish in a Small Pond or a Little Fish in a Big Pond?”

I have been reading this book and I’m learning some stuffs I’d like to share. The question was asked, “Would you choose to be a Big Fish in a Small Pond or a Little Fish in a Big Pond?”

Continue reading “Would you choose to be a Big Fish in a Small Pond or a Little Fish in a Big Pond?”

The Unheard Story of David and Goliath

Recently, I have been loving the talks being made in TED and one that caught my attention (even before the book was published) is the one described by Malcolm Gladwell. He has an unusual insight in the fight surrounding the fight between David and Goliath.

It’s a classic underdog tale: David, a young shepherd armed only with a sling, beats Goliath, the mighty warrior. The story has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks Malcolm Gladwell, is that really what the David and Goliath story is about? Watch and learn the fascinating story that has lessons which can let us see the wisdom behind David’s strength.

During his time, David’s three older brothers have been part of King Saul’s army and he was a shepherd. Since he was small and a shepherd, I believe he learned how to use a sling shot to protect his sheep. Remember that the Benjamites of Israel were the only recorded tribe who can use a sling shot and not miss a hair. But they were almost annihilated because of their wickedness.

After David killed Goliath, the whole Israel announced that David has killed his thousand while King Saul has slain his hundreds but the only person killed by David at that time was Goliath. So here are my lessons:

  • Don’t be afraid to be different.
  • Use your mind more to overcome competition.
  • What is common (and underused) can be used for your advantage.
  • The technology in today’s world is much more powerful and effective in accumulating wealth. So, learn and use them properly and effectively.
  • In creating wealth today, the old way of doing things will take you a lot of years (perhaps never) to get the wealth that would sustain you and your descendants up to fourth generation.
  • Don’t be afraid to learn new things so you can have new experiences.

Kindly share this or re-blog or re-tweet if you appreciate it and spread the idea!

To your success,

Jake De La Cruz

©2014 All rights reserved.

Maestro Lessons (Leading through Listening)

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Here are some of the highlights of my readings in this book. I have been reading books so I can have some ideas on how to be successful in all aspects of life especially in business. This is leading through listening. I hope this will help.

  • Breaking a problem into its most basic elements would eventually lead to its solution.
  • It does not work too well to order musicians to be responsive or cooperative. A great experience would happen only when the motivation sprang as much from them as from me. Acknowledge that they own the music as much as I do. If a leader wants his people to truly own the work, then he has to be willing to let go of some control. Everything I do is aimed at creating a feeling of community and shared responsibility. A leader needs to give corrections and directions. If they see that I am listening to them with great interest and curiosity they will feel encouraged to offer more. A powerful and compelling vision helps people connect their part to the whole. The key to energizing an orchestra’s response is inspiring the same vision in all the players.
  • The proper leverage point can bring about large-scale change without a huge amount of effort. When you study the score, you look for the interrelationship of the parts and the whole, to find the key that effortlessly opens the door. Every word that I speak, every inflection in my voice, every gesture is directed toward the goal of creating a feeling of community.
  • Flow is the bridge that links the present moment to the next. It’s the conduit that transfers energy all around the stage and out to the audience. It’s our primary means of creating a sense of community in the orchestra. Establishing the flow alone can accomplish more than you can by correcting twenty-five details individually.
  • Each musician has an entirely different reality, a different set of facts on which to make his decisions about how to play. The conductor is on the podium because he has been given the authority to lead. His job is to create success. It really falls upon him to stretch his reality until it encompasses that of the players, too.
  • As a conductor, one’s first task is not to stomp one’s own personality on everything, at whatever cost, but to listen. You must take some of your attention away from what you yourself are doing, and focus it on the people you’re here to lead.
  • It’s important to make a distinction between problems that the musicians can best solve themselves, and problems that involve collaboration and teamwork. The direction must be more visionary and strategic and less about helping them manage the details. You must have many different styles and approaches available, and always be looking to expand your range.
  • The power is in them. We don’t create that power, we only direct it. As leaders, we should strive to exert the minimum necessary intervention.
  • Lead, don’t cheer lead. A leader must commit to that which has not yet happened. Otherwise you are really leading; you are actually following. Pre-hear the music they are about to play. The baton is not in the same time zone as the orchestra’s playing. It is only in anticipating, and committing to what will happen next, that any leadership can take place. What energizes people is the leader’s act of committing to what’s possible.
  • The surprising power of listening inspires lively and productive discussion. Central to both business and music is the human capacity for communicating, working together, and self-actualization.
  • When you have a group that’s well disciplined in teamwork, it liberates you to do your best. And then you feel like you’re contributing to something that’s very worthwhile. Sounding in tune is about everyone valuing the collective sound as the highest priority. Part of being an excellent player is your ability, desire and interest in adjusting. Leadership doesn’t make a small difference. It makes all the difference in the world. If you’re a leader, if you stand on a podium, if you hold in your hand a baton, then it falls on your shoulders to make remarkable happen. You can elevate your team to heights beyond their wildest imagination.
  • Conviction – a mass of people manifesting the strongest bond holding them together, their common belief. The maestro is the one who lays the foundation for learning, who teaches the principles and values: the curiosity about the world, the confidence that education eventually leads to freedom, the courage to strive for something higher than just satisfying your appetite, the ideals that last throughout your life.
  • Turn a possibility into a reality. Great music could add an enormous value to a business meeting.

I hope you learned something from these lessons.

To your success,

Jake De La Cruz

P.S. Kindly share this or re-blog or re-tweet if you appreciate it and spread the idea!

©2014 All rights reserved. 

How to Sell Anything to Anybody (Part II)

how-to-sell-anything

Here are some of the highlights of my readings in this book. This is now the second part of the lessons. I have been reading books so I can have some ideas on how to be successful in all aspects of life especially in business. Here’s the first part if you missed it.

  • Plan your work and work your plan. Be in charge of yourself and of what you do. Figure out the right moves to make and make them. Do good, smart and effective work. Narrow and eliminate the gap between you and the customer. Attitude planning is as much a part of planning your selling day as anything else. The question isn’t how hard we work but how well.
  • Honesty is the best policy. Most people who want to buy want to buy it now. Your customer will like what you’re selling if you like what he has. Turn anger into smile. Turn fear into trust. Turn no into yes. Give a little and you’ll get a lot back. You never get caught by telling the truth – or making a prospect feel good when you stretch it.
  • Never wear clothes that will antagonize your customers and make them feel uneasy. Know your customers, if not by name, at least by style and type. Get them with you from the start and they’ll stay with you.
  • To win, sell the sizzle, not the steak. Look for ways in which you can demonstrate your product and be sure that the prospect participates in the demonstration. More things are bought through emotions than through logic. Think of what excites you about a product, or used to when you first bought it. Then use that experience to sell the excitement, the thrill of owning your product.
  • Know what the customer wants, what he ought to do and what he can afford. Try to find out what’s best for him no matte what he says. The most common reason for losing a customer who seemed really interested is not listening enough, not watching the face and body movements of the customer. Let the customer reveal himself, while you watch and listen, and he’ll lay himself open for the close.
  • Make a friend out of every customer. You never know for sure that a customer is sold until he has the product and you have all the money. However good you are at persuading a customer to buy more, be sure he knows what he has agreed to before it is too late.
  • Send a special thank-you letter after the sale. Service problems and other customer complaints are a normal part of all business, regardless of what you sell. Make customers into believers, believers in you and in your interest in their satisfaction. Keep selling after the close – the money gets even bigger.
  • Nobody sells all alone. Your biggest competitor is yourself – what you can do. Use leverage for your advantage. Cut away the sales resistance. Get all the help you can help – it builds gross and net.
  • Decide what best ways to spend money to get the most money back. Look at the situation in your business and find out what are your best opportunities. Whatever you do should be worth more than what it costs you. Find some ways to do things better by spending enough time thinking about it and get new ideas. Don’t be afraid to do it differently – it’s usually better. The stupidest attitude in the world is saying it can’t be done because it hasn’t been done before. Come up with a better way of reaching and selling to your customers. Always look at new things and ways to try and test the value of what you are already doing. Develop your own methods to bring in the customers and the money. Time and money well invested will build your business tremendously.
  • The process of successful selling means endless use of your mental resources. Everyone you meet can become an important part of your business life. Believe that people can change their lives. If you expect to get more, you have to get more. Make yourself a friend that your customer can trust and believe in. The most valuable asset in the selling business is a customer who trusts you because you helped him get what he needed and wanted. Know what makes you effective. What counts is not what kind of store you work in or what kind of merchandise you sell; what counts is how you treat your customers.

I hope you learned something for the second and last part of the lessons I have for this book. Again, here’s the first part if you missed it.

To your success,

Jake De La Cruz

P.S. Kindly share this or re-blog or re-tweet if you appreciate it and spread the idea!

©2014 All rights reserved. 

How to Sell Anything to Anybody (Part I)

how-to-sell-anything

Here are some of the highlights of my readings in this book. This is just the first part of the lessons. I have been reading books so I can have some ideas on how to be successful in all walks of life especially in business.

  • When a salesman sells, there are no losers; both the buyer and the seller win if it’s a good sale. Understand that selling is a continuing process. Change people by selling them the right way. Feeling sorry for yourself is a trap. The only way to have the right attitudes is to know what the wrong ones are and how you got them and why you keep them.
  • Everyone sells but anyone can learn to sell better. Look back to learn how to look forward better.
  • Think about what you’re trying to say, what you should say and what people wanted to hear. Nobody can be a great salesman without wanting something very much and the more you want it, the more you drive yourself to do what it takes to sell. Thus, you have to want something and know what it is exactly, and see that every move you make as a way of getting whatever it is you want. Knowing what you want will power your drive.
  • A good sale is one where the customer goes out with what he came in for, at a good enough price so that he tells his friends, his relatives and his co-workers to buy from you. Make him a friend and he’ll work for you. Remember, you are selling to another human being.
  • However you feel about yourself or whoever you’re with, don’t let it get away from serving those people, prospects or customers because they are the most important thing in the world to us. Girard’s Law of 250: Everyone knows 250 people in his or her life important enough to invite to the wedding and to the funeral. Every time you turn off just one prospect, you turn off 250 more.
  • It is your business, no matter whom you work for or what you sell. And the better you build it, the more the people you sell become your customers. Every minute you spend looking for ways to avoid working costs you money. What counts most is how smart you work, not where you work. If you do a lot of things to build business, you’ll build business. Use all your time to make opportunities.
  • Make your own prospect lists (have a long one) and develop a system for following up by building up the flow through better and productive ways of filling your time.
  • Make sure everybody knows what you sell. Tell people what you do for a living. Include everyone you know in your prospect lists.
  • Satisfied customers are the best bet for future sales. There is nothing more effective in selling anything than getting the customer to believe, really believe, that you like him and care about him. Have your business cards ready because wherever there are people, there are prospects, and if you let them know you are there and what you do, you are building your business. Try to share or sell everybody you talk to.
  • Send your customers a mail every month. The secret is in how creative and interesting you can make it. If they bought before, they’re your best prospects now. Send useful “how-to’ tips, clip news items. Get your name in front of your prospects whenever you can – and get into their homes.
  • Develop a referral system: whom do you know that would like to get $50 for sending me a sale? A satisfied customer is obviously an easy source of other business. Give people gifts or free services. Ask for referrals.

I hope you learned something for the first part of the lessons I have for this book.

To your success,

Jake De La Cruz

P.S. Kindly share this or re-blog or re-tweet if you appreciate it and spread the idea!

©2014 All rights reserved.